Stonehaven Dental team at Seven Peaks Water Park

2016 Patient Appreciation Pool Party: Recap

Summer is coming to an end and at Stonehaven Dental, we love to celebrate! We love to celebrate our patients, our team members, the fun we have had all summer and back to school! Each summer, to show our appreciation for our patients, we host a pool party at Seven Peaks Water Park. We are fortunate to get to know so many families through our profession, and a pool party is just one way we like to say, “Thank You!”

People gather to catch items being tossed at them from a platform

This year’s pool party was awesome! We had over 2500 people attend and unlike years prior, there was no rain. There were a variety of food trucks, a rockin’ DJ and lots of Stonehaven Dental swag to go around.

We wanted to thank everyone who came out to celebrate with us. We are so thankful to be a part of Utah, to be able to practice dentistry and to serve our communities. We couldn’t do it without our patients, and  we’re grateful for every single one.

If you are looking for a new dentist or even just an invite to an awesome party, come visit us. We love to help patients achieve the smile they have always dreamed of. From routine checkups and cleanings to a complete smile makeover, Stonehaven Dental is here for you.

 

THANK YOU!

Stonehaven team members pose with a person in a tooth costume

This girl think she cute flossin her stupid teeth

Stonehaven Dental Reacts to AP Flossing Report

By now, you’ve probably seen or heard about the AP flossing report that claims the “medical benefits of dental flossing [are] unproven.” Needless to say, it has been causing quite a stir in the Stonehaven Dental offices! Not because it’s changing our opinions about oral hygiene – but because the article itself is a little misleading. Read the report here, then we’ll tell you what the dental community has to say, including a response from Andrea Edelen, a Registered Dental Hygienist and the National Director of Hygiene at Mortenson Dental Partners.

 

A lack of good research doesn’t prove something is ineffective.

 

As you’d imagine, a number of dental groups have already publicly shown their support for flossing since the AP report was released. The American Dental Association (ADA) and American Academy of Periodontology (AAP) were both quick to address the duration of these studies, which in general have been conducted only over short periods of time. In the AAP’s official statement about flossing, their president acknowledges that “much of the current evidence does not utilize a large sample size or examine gum health over a significant amount of time. Additionally, many of the existing studies do not measure true markers of periodontal health such as inflammation or clinical attachment loss.” And that “because the development of periodontal disease is slow in nature and because a variety of factors can impact its progression, studies that examine the efficacy of daily flossing are best conducted over a number of years and among a large population.”

What the studies in the AP report failed to incorporate in their research were very important factors, primarily family history and the presence of other health issues. One doctor even said he doubted the patients in the study flossed correctly. So although there may be conflicting conclusions about the efficacy of flossing, it’s worth remembering that flossing is only one aspect of maintaining good oral health. Just like maintaining a good diet is only one aspect of physical health.

 

The American Dental Association still defends flossing as an essential part of taking care of teeth and gums.

 

The AP report, despite all its claims that flossing is ineffective, still never fully endorses an end to flossing altogether. In fact, the report ends with a recommendation from Dr. Iafolla, a public health analyst at the National Institutes of Health: Office of Science Policy, to keep flossing once a day. “It’s low-risk, low-cost,” Dr. Iafolla said. “We know there’s a possibility that it works, so we feel comfortable telling people to go ahead and do it.” In an August 4 release, the ADA argues that the federal government has never changed its stance on flossing and “the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) made a deliberate decision to focus on food and nutrient intake (i.e., added sugar).”

“According to the American Dental Association (ADA), interdental cleaners such as floss are an essential part of taking care of your teeth and gums. Cleaning between teeth removes plaque that can lead to cavities or gum disease from the areas where a toothbrush can’t reach. Interdental cleaning is proven to help remove debris between teeth that can contribute to plaque buildup.”

Dental hygiene care plans should be personalized.

The official statement from the American Dental Hygienists Association (ADHA) endorses a dental hygiene care plan that is “personalized according to the individual’s unique oral health needs, general health status, values, expectations and abilities. Not all adjunct devices are appropriate for all patients, and it is important for dental hygiene professionals to work with their patients on which interdental cleaning method fits their needs.” For some patients, this could mean using a Waterpik®, or a water-flossing product that has been proven more effective than string floss at improving gum health. For others, like the dentist in the video above, the answer could be an old-fashioned wooden toothpick. Whatever decision you make, there is no better person to help you decide what’s right for you than the person who knows your teeth the best – your dental hygienist.

 

Now that you’ve heard how everyone else is responding, let’s hear what Andrea Edelen, a real-life Registered Dental Hygienist (RDH), has to say:

Professional Portrait of Andrea Edelen

Andrea Edelen, RDH, BS, National Director of Hygiene, Mortenson Dental Partners

“We believe in dental hygiene practice that is both evidence-based and patient-centered. Our standard of care emphasizes that the oral hygiene recommendations be personalized according to the patient’s unique oral health needs, general health status, and abilities. Not all adjunct devices are appropriate for all patients, and it is important for dental professionals to work with their patients on which interdental cleaning method fits their needs. The ADA supports flossing with proper technique among other interdental cleaners being beneficial to removing bacteria, biofilm, and food debris from interproximal areas that a tooth brush cannot access.”

Grand Opening: Saratoga Springs

Join us this Thursday, July 21, from 5-8 for the official Grand Opening of our new Saratoga Springs location.

We’ll have food, music and swag, plus a host of other cool giveaways! Everyone who attends is eligible to get free custom bleach trays and can even enter to win free dental services at Stonehaven Dental. Drop by, say hi, have some hors d’oeuvres, and of course get to know Dr. Kiley BossDr. Jennifer McMurtrey and the rest of our team a little better! Check out the event on Facebook and share it with your friends by clicking here.

Team Saratoga Springs


Our Saratoga Springs team is excited to be serving the dental needs of this tight knit, growing community. Located near the intersection of Crossroads Blvd and Commerce Drive, Stonehaven Dental offers a variety of dental services for the whole family. From a first tooth to teeth whitening and dentures, we are here no matter what you need to have a smile that makes you feel confident. Our office is just west of the Jordan River and North of the scenic Utah Lake. [Read More]


 

Four F’s for a Successful Fourth of July Weekend

This Monday is the Fourth of July, a day when we celebrate declaring our independence from Great Britain in 1776. In that Declaration of Independence we talked a lot about fairness and freedom, but our founding fathers probably didn’t foresee some other F’s that would make our Independence Day the awesome holiday it’s become.

What’s your favorite F? Let us know by voting in our poll on Twitter.

 

Family & Friends

Mixed Race young people making selfie at garden party. Man from Jamaica Playing Guitar. Man on right holding smart phone on selfie stick. In background people holding American flag.

Oops, look at us – already cheating.  This first F is a two-for-one because it’s really all about people. A lot of families plan road trips this weekend to visit other cities, go camping or hit a theme park like Lagoon Park. And friends will get together for grilling out, lawn games or just hanging out enjoying the weather. Whatever you decide to do, remember to pack a travel-sized toothbrush and toothpaste or some mouthwash to help those relationships get even closer!

 

Food

A patriotic fruit tart.

This one’s a no-brainer. We’re talking Potlucks on patios with pounds of potato salad and pints of patriotic ice cream flavors. There is nothing quite like a hamburger, hot dog or veggies off the grill in the summer. Throw in an ice-cold glass of sweet tea to wash it down, and you’ll know you’re doing it right.

Don’t forget to drink a glass of water after your meal to wash some of that sugar off your teeth!

 

 

Fireworks

friend running with fireworks on a beach afer sunsetWho doesn’t love running around with sparklers after dark or shooting roman candles into the sky and hearing them pop? It really doesn’t matter how many times you’ve heard “I’m Proud to be an American” blaring over a loudspeaker as you watch fireworks light up your city, it’s awesome every time. ‘Nuff said.

 

 

Floss Fun

Group of teen girls laughing and eating ice cream at the beach together

You knew we were going to do it, didn’t you? Well here’s your reminder to floss every day. But the last one is not “Floss” and it’s actually the most important F of the weekend: FUN. Our country has come a long way in its short history and though we’ve been through a lot, we have a lot to be proud of! So let’s remember this weekend to enjoy good company, good food and have a great time celebrating what makes us unique.

 

Have a safe and happy Independence Day!

 

Hands on stomach with a spotlight focused on them to symbolize stomach pain

CROHN’S DISEASE, COLITIS AND ORAL HEALTH

About 5 million people worldwide are living with Crohn’s Disease or ulcerative colitis, also known as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These chronic diseases affect the digestive system and cause intestinal tissue to become inflamed, form sores and bleed easily. Crohn’s specifically can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract including the lips, mouth and even the esophagus. And in addition to the physical and emotional toll IBD has on the well-being of its patients such as weight loss, fever, nausea, diarrhea and anemia, it can also have a number of negative effects on oral health.

Sometimes it is difficult to tell what is causing changes in the mouth such as ulcers, soreness, dry mouth or cavities. Sometimes medications taken to treat Crohn’s disease interfere with normal mouth bacteria that can cause problems. IBD can also lead to nutritional deficiencies that affect dental and oral health. In other instances, it is the disease itself causing the problems. Your doctor can identify whether Crohn’s or colitis is interfering with the health of your teeth and gums with testing.

African-American man touching sore toothCavities & Tooth Decay

For 8-29% of patients with Crohn’s Disease, cavities can appear before any intestinal complications. Many patients have reported an increase in tooth decay and higher incidence of cavities as they have undergone treatment for Crohn’s. And studies have shown that changes caused by colitis in the mucus that lines the gastrointestinal tract have led to tooth decay in some patients. Patients who are using Prednisone for their symptoms might want to consult their physician and dentist as some patients have reported a link between the medication and cavities. In our research, this was a very common side effect of medical treatment and the connection should not be taken lightly.

 


African-American woman holding sore jaw

Mouth Ulcers & Vitamin Deficiencies

Inflammatory Bowel Disease is known to cause legions throughout the intestine, colon, esophagus as well as in and around patients’ mouths. Poor vitamin consumption, particularly of vitamin D, can lead to complications that range from small, painless lesions inside the mouth to ulcerations and swelling of the lips. This can lead to more serious issues like Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome, oral tuberculosis, cheilitis granulomatosa, sarcoidosis, or even contact allergic reactions. Pyodermatitis-pyostomatitis vegetans is also associated with Crohn’s disease, but only rarely. Symptoms include pustules (pimples) that can be yellow or whitish in appearance in the mouth. After the pustules rupture, they leave a superficial ulcer. The lymph glands under the chin can become swollen and there may be mild pain. Yeast infections and deficiencies in Vitamin A, Vitamin B12, zinc and Vitamin K are common.


 

Caucasian brunette holding side of face with frown

Gum Inflammation & Gingivitis

Gum problems, such as swollen or bleeding gums, can be another complication of Crohn’s and may be the result of poor nutrition. Getting the right vitamins and minerals in your diet is crucial to good overall health and oral health, but the combination of Crohn’s and mouth problems can leave you with little appetite or interest in eating. You might need to work harder on the quality of your diet because the consequences of Crohn’s can prevent your body from taking advantage of all the nutrients in the foods you eat; instead, food is moved through your system without being fully digested. Some medicines can contribute to inflammation and gingivitis, so if you are using the following medications, you might want to talk with your doctor about possible alternatives: Steroids, Mesalazine and Methotrexate.


 

Athletic woman holding apple and water bottle

Prevention

As always, we encourage you to discuss your symptoms and treatment options with your doctor or dentist. But the following tips will not only help your overall health, they might also prevent dental complications associated with IBD:

  • Avoid sweetened drinks like soda, juice and energy drinks
  • Limit the amount of dairy (milk, cheese, yogurt) you eat
  • Get plenty of sunlight or take a vitamin D supplement
  • Eat 5 or 6 small meals each day that are low in saturated fat, with lots of fruit and antioxidant-rich foods (beans, berries, apples)
  • Stop smoking!

If you have IBD, let’s talk! We’d love to help you find the right treatment for your oral health. Call (801) 701-9799 today!

For Women with Osteoporosis, Dental Implants Improve Quality of Life

For women going through menopause, osteoporosis might be the last thing on your mind. But as you age past 50, bone density should be of greater concern to you. Osteoporosis is a condition that causes bones to become weak and brittle — so brittle that a fall or even mild stresses like bending over or coughing can cause a fracture — and it often hits hardest after menopause. Osteoporosis has been linked to bone loss in the jaw which weakens its density and leads to tooth loss. Every day, women everywhere must choose between dentures and dental implants to replace their teeth, and we know the choice is hard. But a recent study suggests the answer is simpler than we thought: Dental implants might just improve your quality of life.

Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine found that women with implants experienced increased comfort, speech, chewing function, and fit compared to other restorations. “Our research suggests that there are likely some comfort-related factors, some functionality, and some aesthetic reasons why an implant restoration bypasses the quality of the others,” says co-author Leena Palomo, DDS, MSD, an associate professor and director of the periodontics program at Case Western Reserve. “Intuitively it would make sense that an implant restoration is better in comfort and function compared to a fixed or removable restoration, but the collective effect of these factors is seen in distant psychosocial measures.”

The study surveyed 237 osteoporotic women with one or more adjacent teeth missing and asked them to rate their occupational, health, emotional, and sexual quality of life. The results showed that women with dental implants scored higher overall than those with fixed partial dentures, removable partial dentures, or no restorations.

Implant Fixed Partial Denture Removable Partial Denture No Restoration
Occupational Score 26.79 26.86 21.42 20.59
Health Score 26.45 21.32 20.05 19.23
Emotional Score 25.75 26.86 17.03 15.29
Sexual Score 28.59 24.84 15.26 11.45
Overall Score 107.58 99.88 73.77 66.56

If you’re dealing with osteoporosis and looking to enjoy life a little more, give us a call at (801) 701-9799! We’d be happy to schedule a consultation to discuss the best restoration for you.

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